Restaurant boss rejects foie gras

First published in News

AN Oxfordshire restaurant boss has pledged never to serve foie gras.

Pete Borg-Neal, owner of Oakman Inns, which runs the Blue Boar in Witney and the Old Post Office in Wallingford, made the promise to PETA — People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals.

He said: “I have come to the conclusion that it is too difficult to monitor farming practices with respect to foie gras and, consequently, the risk of cruelty is too high to be acceptable to me.

“I therefore can confirm that we will not be putting foie gras on our menus nor will we be using it as an ingredient in any other dishes.”

To produce foie gras, which means “fatty liver” in French, ducks and geese are force-fed until their livers swell to up to 10 times their normal size. Foie gras production is illegal in the UK, but not its sale.

Comments (3)

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10:49am Mon 11 Nov 13

LadyBoy says...

Shame, as its bloody tasty!
Shame, as its bloody tasty! LadyBoy
  • Score: -10

1:23pm Mon 11 Nov 13

AngelB says...

Good for him, it is good to know that some businesses do care about such things.

However I would ask, as production of this product is known to be very cruel - and therefore banned in the UK - why is importing it legal? Although the cruelty happens it is not happening in the UK so that's alright is it?
Good for him, it is good to know that some businesses do care about such things. However I would ask, as production of this product is known to be very cruel - and therefore banned in the UK - why is importing it legal? Although the cruelty happens it is not happening in the UK so that's alright is it? AngelB
  • Score: 12

2:12pm Mon 11 Nov 13

Man on the Green says...

We used to live near a foie gras producing farm on the Continent which was open to the public at all times (as they said, they had nothing to hide).

Despite my initial hesitation and very considerable reservations, I observed the geese and ducks rushing up to position their heads freely on the forked supports, open their beaks wide, and eagerly await the "gavage" funnel through which the rich nutrients were poured, and had to conclude that there was certainly no "forcing" in such feeding. They roamed freely in a large field all day, and slept in a hay filled barn, and were better cared for than any chickens I have ever seen, even those of our hen-loving neighbours, and far better than most farm livestock.
We used to live near a foie gras producing farm on the Continent which was open to the public at all times (as they said, they had nothing to hide). Despite my initial hesitation and very considerable reservations, I observed the geese and ducks rushing up to position their heads freely on the forked supports, open their beaks wide, and eagerly await the "gavage" funnel through which the rich nutrients were poured, and had to conclude that there was certainly no "forcing" in such feeding. They roamed freely in a large field all day, and slept in a hay filled barn, and were better cared for than any chickens I have ever seen, even those of our hen-loving neighbours, and far better than most farm livestock. Man on the Green
  • Score: 1

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