Prime Minister calls for talks on Oxford's £123m flood relief channel

Witney Gazette: David Cameron David Cameron

TALKS are to take place between Oxford’s political leaders and Downing Street officials about plans for a £123m flood relief channel in the city.

Prime Minister and Witney MP David Cameron has ordered his advisers to meet Bob Price, leader of Oxford City Council, about the scheme which could prevent Botley Road and Abingdon Road from flooding in the future.

The Government also confirmed yesterday that flood relief projects worth a total of £14.4m would commence in 2014/15 across Oxfordshire.

They include an £8m plan in West Oxfordshire, as well as £4.9m on three different schemes in Oxford.

Witney Gazette:

  • The only way to travel along Oxford’s Abingdon Road during last month’s floods

Last night, the River Thames at New Botley was on an Environment Agency flood warning, alerting residents that more flooding is expected.

News of the meeting comes after the Government announced an extra £130m of funding for flood relief work across the UK.

Officials were unable to confirm last night how much of Oxfordshire’s £14.4m came from the pot of new money.

Last month Mr Price wrote to the Prime s continued from page 1 Minister asking for funding for the channel, otherwise known as the Western Conveyance Channel.

Replying, Mr Cameron said: “As we all know, Oxford suffered very badly in the recent floods and I am determined that all appropriate measures are taken to try and mitigate against risks of future flooding in our local community.

“This seems a worthwhile project. However, I understand that the Environment Agency has some value for money concerns which do need to be looked into.”

Mr Price will be attending the meeting with Government officials – at a date to be fixed – with Rodney Rose, the deputy leader of Oxfordshire County Council, who said the Western Conveyance channel is the only solution to Oxford’s flood woes.

The scheme, which would be as wide as the River Thames, went out to consultation three years ago but never progressed due to a lack of funding.

It would run from Seacourt Stream north of Botley Road to the River Thames at Sandford Lock, diverting water away from Oxford.

Mr Rose said: “If we have that, we are protecting Botley Road, Abingdon Road and the main Oxford to Paddington railway line.”

Danny Alexander, Chief Secretary to the Treasury, yesterday said funding for the project could still be available but it would be up to the Environment Agency to say when.

Speaking on a visit to Kidlington construction apprentice firm ACE Training, he said: “I don’t know the details of the position of that particular project.

“But what I would say is as a Government we have set aside both more money for flood defences and over a longer period of time.”

Witney Gazette:

  • Danny Alexander

He said the funding had been set out up until 2020, adding: “I hope that out of that money (the Environment Agency) will be able to find all of the important projects needed in communities like Oxford.”

Mr Price said: “The economic disruption to the city and the wider area around Oxford is phenomenal and that is something we need to flag up to Government.

“This is not something we can dilly and dally about because there is a window of opportunity now for the next funding round of the Environment Agency.”

The Environment Agency is carrying out modelling on the Western Conveyance scheme to find out whether parts of it should go ahead. It is hoped a section of the channel at Sandford Lock, at around £2.5m, would have the biggest effect and be done first.

The Environment Agency has also reviewed the costs of the scheme and said it could now be done for £123m – £40m less than expected.

Its spokeswoman Colette Walmsley said: “We would support the construction of the Western Conveyance Channel if we can get funding.

“It could be funded from public and private sectors and we’re in initial discussions with potential partners.”

Yesterday, the Government announced approval had been given to 42 new flood schemes in the country – including 11 in Oxfordshire.

They include the Northway and Marston Flood Alleviation Scheme costing £1.5m and the Godstow Weir B refurbishment at £366,000.

Floods Minister Dan Rogerson said: “More money than ever before is being invested in flood defences and the new schemes will give greater security to thousands of homes and businesses that previously feared flooding.”

The Environment Agency is anticipating more flooding as heavy rainfall is predicted for today. Last night 11 waterways in Oxfordshire were on flood alert while the River Thames at New Botley was on a flood warning.

THOSE GIVEN APPROVAL

Government information states these schemes will begin in Oxfordshire in 2014/15:

  • Paddle and Rymer H&S (West Oxfordshire), £8m
  • Thames Weirs Priority Programme Package Two (Oxford), £2.2m
  • Bicester Industrial Area Initial Assesment, £330,000
  • Florence Park (Oxford) FAS, £381,000 s Oxford Short Term Measures Two, £1.2m
  • Watlington, £416,000
  • Wendlebury, £355,000
  • Northway and Marston Flood Alleviation Scheme, £1.5m
  • Wheatley South East Flood Alleviation, £55,000

Eleven new schemes got funding for Oxfordshire costing £368,000. Four are Flooding Grant in Aid funded in 2014-15, and £119,000 of GiA investment has been allocated. The rest are funded from the local levy fund totalling £249,000 in 2014-15:

  • Maintenance to paddle and rymer weirs – £5,000 (GiA)
  • Oxford Short Term Measures 2 – works to improve an existing defence or create a new structure – £3,000 (GiA)
  • Refurbishment of Godstow Weir B – £108,000 (GiA) s Witney Initial Assessment to improve an existing defence or create one – £25,000 (Levy)
  • Florence Park (Oxford) – Works to improve an existing defence or create one – £20,000 (Levy)
  • Works to improve an existing defence or create one in Watlington – £25,000 (Levy) s Bicester Industrial Area Initial Assessment – works to improve existing defence or create one – £2,000 (Levy)
  • Works to improve an existing defence or create one in Wendlebury – £25,000 (Levy)
  • Northway & Marston flood Alleviation Scheme – Works to improve existing defence or create one – £100,000 (Levy)
  • Wheatley South-East Flood Alleviation – Works to improve existing defence or create one – £25,000 (Levy)
  • Oxford Western Conveyance Channel Review – Strategy – £3,000 (GiA) £27,000 (Levy)

GiA is money the Environment Agency receives from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, allocated to flood and coastal risk management works in England.

Local levy is raised by councils from householders, from the council tax

Comments (8)

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9:41am Fri 7 Feb 14

EMBOX2 says...

Just give the rivers another 3 ft of depth, and allow all the water to get downstream faster. We don't need this flood relief channel - only proper management of the waterways.
Just give the rivers another 3 ft of depth, and allow all the water to get downstream faster. We don't need this flood relief channel - only proper management of the waterways. EMBOX2
  • Score: -3

9:48am Fri 7 Feb 14

Thames2006 says...

What will happen to Abingdon when all this water is moved downstream more quickly from Oxford?
What will happen to Abingdon when all this water is moved downstream more quickly from Oxford? Thames2006
  • Score: 7

10:00am Fri 7 Feb 14

angelox99 says...

Thames2006 wrote:
What will happen to Abingdon when all this water is moved downstream more quickly from Oxford?
It will become Abingdon-Under-Thame
s!
[quote][p][bold]Thames2006[/bold] wrote: What will happen to Abingdon when all this water is moved downstream more quickly from Oxford?[/p][/quote]It will become Abingdon-Under-Thame s! angelox99
  • Score: 6

12:28pm Fri 7 Feb 14

Patrick, Devon says...

Speaking as a farmer in the very wet South West, there is an old saying - one persons drain is another ones flood. Flood control is not just about moving water downstream - its about the capacity of the land to hold it. Land drainage results in rivers rising very quickly when it rains, and falling very quickly when it doesnt. Thats why we have a frequent flood/drought cycle, exacerbated now by climate change. If you want to control flooding you will need to look upstream and understand natural processes. Perhaps upstream dams, lakes and reservoirs are needed, together with more appropriate land management.
Speaking as a farmer in the very wet South West, there is an old saying - one persons drain is another ones flood. Flood control is not just about moving water downstream - its about the capacity of the land to hold it. Land drainage results in rivers rising very quickly when it rains, and falling very quickly when it doesnt. Thats why we have a frequent flood/drought cycle, exacerbated now by climate change. If you want to control flooding you will need to look upstream and understand natural processes. Perhaps upstream dams, lakes and reservoirs are needed, together with more appropriate land management. Patrick, Devon
  • Score: 5

4:11pm Fri 7 Feb 14

Sophia says...

Yes and when the result is that everywhere downstream floods much more quickly and badly, every town and village can get its very own £150m flood by pass.
Yes and when the result is that everywhere downstream floods much more quickly and badly, every town and village can get its very own £150m flood by pass. Sophia
  • Score: 2

4:52pm Fri 7 Feb 14

Andrew:Oxford says...

It's all very well discussing it, but will the Oxford(shire) branch of the CPRE sanction it?
It's all very well discussing it, but will the Oxford(shire) branch of the CPRE sanction it? Andrew:Oxford
  • Score: 0

7:34pm Fri 7 Feb 14

OutToPasture says...

The conservatives stopped river dredging in 1994.

Since 2007, it has regularly flooded in West Oxfordshire. Between 1960 and 2007 there had been no flooding in areas such as Stanton Harcourt, Northmoor and Bablock Hythe.

Since 1994, the river beds and flooding channels have been neglected. Beds get higher, drains and channels get overgrown, especially in rural areas.

I remember seeing the Environment Agency and Rivers Authority used to come out and clear these channels and dredge the bed along the Thames, but in recent years we've had the likes of DEFRA and the EA reclassify areas as flood plains instead of dealing with the issues.

Shutting St Johns lock everytime Oxford is threatened just makes the problem move up stream.

Since 2007, nothing has been done to address the repeated flooding and places like Bablock Hythe get ignored unless Mr Cameron is looking for some publicity.
The conservatives stopped river dredging in 1994. Since 2007, it has regularly flooded in West Oxfordshire. Between 1960 and 2007 there had been no flooding in areas such as Stanton Harcourt, Northmoor and Bablock Hythe. Since 1994, the river beds and flooding channels have been neglected. Beds get higher, drains and channels get overgrown, especially in rural areas. I remember seeing the Environment Agency and Rivers Authority used to come out and clear these channels and dredge the bed along the Thames, but in recent years we've had the likes of DEFRA and the EA reclassify areas as flood plains instead of dealing with the issues. Shutting St Johns lock everytime Oxford is threatened just makes the problem move up stream. Since 2007, nothing has been done to address the repeated flooding and places like Bablock Hythe get ignored unless Mr Cameron is looking for some publicity. OutToPasture
  • Score: 0

10:20pm Fri 7 Feb 14

faatmaan says...

for every action there is a consequence, all we will achieve is moving the problem to some where else less influential, money talks !
for every action there is a consequence, all we will achieve is moving the problem to some where else less influential, money talks ! faatmaan
  • Score: 0

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